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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 42-46

A point prevalence survey of antimicrobial prescribing in four Nigerian Tertiary Hospitals


1 Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Lagos/Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Medical Microbiology, Ahmadu Bello University/Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria
3 Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Health Sciences, University of Abuja/National Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria
4 Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, Vaccine & Infectious Disease Institute (VAXINFECTIO), University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium
5 Department of Medical, Microbiology, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
O O Oduyebo
Department of Medical Microbiology, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/atp.atp_38_17

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Introduction: Antimicrobial resistance has become a global challenge in health care. Its emergence in previously sensitive bacteria is usually associated with poor antibiotic-prescribing patterns. Methodology: A point prevalence survey was carried out in four tertiary hospitals in Nigeria in 2015 to determine the rate and characteristics of antibiotic prescription. Results: Of 828 patients eligible for the study, 69.7% received antibiotics, with highest rates in the adult Intensive Care Unit. There were therapeutic indications in 51.2% of the prescriptions, of which 89.5% were for community-acquired infections. Third-generation cephalosporins were the most prescribed antibiotics. On the evaluation of surgical prophylaxis, only 4.1% were compliant with institutional guidelines and 39.2% gave a reason for prescribing in patient case notes. Less than 1% of the prescriptions were based on the use of biomarkers. Conclusion: The prevalence of antibiotic prescription in Nigerian hospitals is high with only about 50% of prescriptions based on clear therapeutic indications. We provide evidence that the country needs to institute a cohesive antimicrobial stewardship intervention program.


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